Lost and Found

Things in my life that have been stolen:  five strands of large-bulb Xmas lights off the giant pine tree in our front yard. Our family van from the Newark Airport…Twice! My heart on Valentine’s Day when I was 13, twenty dollars out of my back pocket at a Fugazi concert, my bicycle from the back of Toran’s truck in the Mission District before we were married, artwork off the MEX/US border on the Tijuana side, my cell phone on BART 7 years ago, and again last week, from my car in front of the Seed Bank.

 This bike was stolen on Harrison and 25th in SF. In 2005.  I had been known to get across town in less than 10 minutes on this thing.

This bike was stolen on Harrison and 25th in SF. In 2005.  I had been known to get across town in less than 10 minutes on this thing.

 Gonzalo Hidalco and I painted these, and drilled them onto the Tijuana border...slowly, they disappeared, one by one.

Gonzalo Hidalco and I painted these, and drilled them onto the Tijuana border...slowly, they disappeared, one by one.

All of these were replaced, mended, or forgiven. My attachment to objects is minimal and I’m grateful to enjoy the things I do have: my family, friends, a fabulous community, healthy food, the joy of cooking, and work on a project I love. This movie has the potential to change the way we think about birth in America, Why Not Home?

Well, why not? Our home is where all the love in the world lies. When I walk into my home I feel it--all the things and clutter aside. Wouldn’t it be lovely if this choice were available and accessible to more women and families?

 Laying in bed after our son was born.  

Laying in bed after our son was born.  

Out of all the things that were stolen, my birth experiences were not. While working on this film I have had the opportunity to hear many birth stories. Most of them happy, some of them sad, but all of the stories I’ve heard were beautiful.

The other day I was talking to a woman about our film. She expressed so much joy over our efforts and the possibilities...and then she told me her story. Thirty-six years ago she arrived at the hospital and was given intervention after intervention. Eventually she had the baby without knowing.  Several hours later, she awoke to find a cleaned baby in a bassinet in another room.   

Thankfully hospitals have changed significantly in the past 36 years, but it's a story I've heard more than once. These women were deeply saddened, and still, after all this time, felt hurt and angry.

Listening to their stories – told with such passion – I too felt their sadness. I found myself lost in their stories while the rest of the world stood still. I think you will find that this film, full of stories, perspectives, and challenges, will also make you pause.

What can be found when we embrace this experience and support women and families in their decisions? There is a way to improve quality and offer more choices, at home and in the hospital. Our birth experiences should never be stolen, but instead respected and honored as a beautiful beginning.

When you support this film, please share with us and with your community your beautiful beginnings, and why you think this film is worth supporting. We'd love to share your story with the Home Birth Summit next week.

by: Kelly Collins-Geiser

http://kellycollinsgeiser.com